Illinois Labor Law

Minimum Wages:

Starting July 1, 2010, Illinois’ Minimum Wage level has been increased to $8.25. Click HERE for public act 094-1072




Illinois Credit Check Law

A new law limits the use of credit checks in hiring in Illinois. The Employee Privacy Act which goes into effect on January 1, 2011 prohibits employers from using credit checks in making employment decisions such as hiring. Some exceptions apply for banking industry, insurance industry, state law enforcement agencies and debt collection agencies. Employers can still do a background check, but cannot obtain a credit report unless the employee meets the criteria above. The law was passed by the Illinois house and signed into law by Governor Pat Quinn on August 10, 2010.



Illinois Wage Theft Act

Starting January 1, 2011, Illinois legislature adopted a new amendment to the existing Wage Payment Collection Act, a so called "Wage Theft Act," which experts say makes Illinois’ wage theft laws among the strongest in the country. A new law gives workers more tools to fight so called “wage theft,” when employers withhold or miscalculate employee payments. Employers who violate wage theft laws will have to pay workers back from the date of nonpayment with interest and a $250 fine. Depending on the violation, an employer may also owe interest to the Illinois Department of Labor.

Moreover, starting January 1, 2011, Labor Department and not Attorney General Office will be in charge of these claims. According to the new bill “wage theft” occurs when businesses knowingly fail to pay workers earned wages or fail to pay in compliance with labor law, which includes not paying for overtime and work done off the clock.

A successful claimant-employee will also be able to receive reimbursement for his or her attorney fees.

The amendment also provides that an aggrieved employee may recover interest from the date of underpayment at 2% of the underpaid amount for each month the wages remain unpaid. If an employer fails to comply with or timely appeal an IDOL or court order, the employer will also be liable to pay a penalty to the IDOL totaling 20% of the amount owed, along with a penalty to the employee of 1% per calendar day of the amount owed for each day of delay. Additionally, the amendment provides for enhanced criminal penalties: ranging from a Class A or Class B misdemeanor for a willful refusal to pay to a felony for a repeat conviction within two years.

For more information visit IDOL web site.

Sill have questions? Call us today
847-241-1299.

 

Comments  

 
0 #2 Fedor 2013-05-13 16:27
Aris,

Please send me any paperwork that you might have received from IDES.
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0 #1 ARIS EWINGS 2013-05-01 15:01
TRY TO GET MY UNEMPLOYMENT NOV 2011 AND LAST DAY WORK WAS NOV23 2012 I BEEN FILING MY CLAIMS AND KNOW WHATS THE PROBLEM JUST GETTING THE RUN AROUNDS CAN YOU HELP ME AND GIVE ME QE
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